Review: Ruiner Pinball (Jaguar)

When I think of video games, I rarely think of pinball. It’s not a genre I have much interest in. In fact, the only pinball game I’ve spent any real amount of time with is Kirby’s Pinball Land on the original Game Boy. That was 15 years ago. I’m no expert on the genre, nor could I tell you what makes a pinball game good versus bad. With Ruiner Pinball for the Atari Jaguar, I’m entering uncharted territory.

Read More

Blog: IMPLANTgames.com Wallpaper and PhotoShop

Since the year 2000 when I began making websites, I've been using Jasc PaintShop Pro for all of my web graphics. I started with PaintShop Pro 7, and later upgraded to version 8. At the time, it was the only real alternative to PhotoShop and I was on a budget. This summer, I bought my first Mac, and am going back to school. So I finally made the jump to PhotoShop.

Read More

Review: TNN Motorsports Hardcore Heat (Dreamcast)

You know something is getting old when it references companies that no longer exist. Like the Pan Am advertisements in Blade Runner. Or a game with TNN in the title. Which leads us to TNN Motorsports Hardcore Heat. This was known as Buggy Heat in Japan, and was a Sega Dreamcast Launch title in North America.

Read More

Feature: How to Hook Up a Sega Dreamcast via HDMI

Feature: How to Hook Up a Sega Dreamcast via HDMI

Like many retro gamers, my living room is now home to an over-sized flat panel display. While this is great for modern game systems, Blu-ray players, and even my old HD DVD player, it’s not ideal for classic consoles. For whatever reason (foresight perhaps), Sega offered a VGA cable for the Sega Dreamcast that allows games to be presented in glorious 480p (640x480 progressive scan). Additionally, this output removes a lot of filtering that softens the image to reduce the appearance of “jaggies.”

Read More

Blog: Sonic XBLA, IGN rant, and Lord of War Parody

On September 15, 2010 Sonic Adventure was released on Microsoft's Xbox Live Arcade service. I rarely fire up the Xbox 360 anymore, as most of my time is spent on my classic systems. In either case, I was excited to spend the $10 (800 microsoft points) and play this on the flat panel television. Prior to purchasing, I searched for reviews. The first review from IGN was depressing.

Read More

Review: Darius Twin (Super Nintendo)

Darius Twin marks the first appearance of the Darius franchise on the Super Nintendo Entertainment System and the third game in the series’ cannon. It was developed by Taito (of Bubble Bobble fame) and released stateside in November 1991. The Super Nintendo is not traditionally known for it’s shmups (unlike the TurboGrafx-16 and Sega Genesis), so how does Darius Twin stand up?

Read More

Review: Sonic Triple Trouble (Game Gear)

Sonic Triple Trouble was released for Sega's Game Gear in November 1994. It was known as Sonic & Tails 2 in Japan. Sonic Triple Trouble marked the fourth and final traditional Sonic game on the handheld. I have played the first 3 Sonic Game Gear games but was never impressed. So how does the final outing hold up? Read on.

Read More

Review: Supercross 3D (Jaguar)

Supercross 3D was released for the Atari Jaguar on December 20, 1995, and capped off the Jaguar's final holiday season. The game is an ambitious attempt to simulate the sport of Supercross with the use of a textured polygon engine. I came into Supercross 3D with extreme skepticism and very low expectations, as it is one of the lowest rated Atari Jaguar games there are. So is it really that bad?

Read More

Review: The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening (Game Boy)

The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening was released for the Game Boy in 1993 and was the fourth Zelda game released state side. It is also the first portable Zelda game developed. Generally, I'm not a huge fan of RPGs: I don't like level grinding, random battles, turn-based combat, and 40+ hours of game play. But there is something about the Zelda games that really breaks the RPG mold and captures my attention.

Read More

Review: Dunk Dream (Neo Geo CD)

Dunk Dream was released in Japanese arcades and on SNK's Neo Geo hardware in 1994. It is known as Street Hoop in North America and Street Slam in Europe, and is one of the few Neo Geo games to have a unique title in each of the three territories. Released a year after Midway's excellent NBA Jam, it's hard not to compare the two games. So how does Japan's answer to NBA Jam hold up? Read on to find out.

Read More